Networking Primer – Part 6.3: Layer 2 Switching – Loops, Spanning Tree and Topologies

Old Telephony Switchboard

Previous: Networking Primer – Part 6.2: Media Access Control – CSMA/CD, CSMA/CA

We were briefly introduced to devices called Network Switches in the last post in this series. A switch essentially acts as a central connection point in a star topology for many network nodes.It is similar to a Hub from a topological perspective but whereas a hub will take a frame in from one port and broadcast it out on all of the other ports, a switch has some built-in intelligence so it may forward the frame only to those ports which should receive the frame. I like to think of a switch very much like it’s similar namesake, the switchboard, from the public telephony world.

In this older world, you picked up your phone to call the operator. When the operator at the other end answered, you would tell her/him who you would like to call, […]

Networking Primer – Part 6.2: Media Access Control – CSMA/CD, CSMA/CA

Previous: Networking Primer – Part 6.1: Data Link Layer, Ethernet and MAC

I will start this post with a foreword that at least one of the protocols in the title, CSMA/CD, is obsolete. I’m including it here as it’s very useful to understand why we no longer need it, due to the changes in layer 2 topologies that have evolved over time. A little history can illuminate why we are where we are.

CSMA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access) is a methodology that deals with multiple computing nodes access the same physical media, whether that be a piece of wire, optical fibre or even the air. It makes sense that there should be some rules around when each node can transmit/receive rather than a free-for-all where interference, possible corruption and inefficiency can occur. The media is being shared so access needs to be given through arbitration.

There are […]

Networking Primer – Part 6.1: Data Link Layer, Ethernet and MAC

Previous:Networking Primer – Part 5.3: Network Layer – IP Routing

In previous posts we’ve covered logical addressing and moving IP packets of data across our network from source to destination. We’re now going to take a further shift towards the bits and bytes details of how that logical addressing and routing relates to the more tangible physical media that is used to transmit the data. This is where the Data Link Layer becomes applicable. “The Data Link Layer” is a bit of a mouthful, so this is often dropped and the OSI stack layer number is substituted, Layer 2. From this point forward I will use “Data Link Layer” and “Layer 2” as interchangeable terms which mean exactly the same thing.

The Data Link Layer breaks down into two sub-layers. Firstly, we have the upper sub-layer, called Logical Link Control (LLC) and beneath it we have the Media Access […]